Eternity of Terror 2019

This book includes 200 dark movies you’ll want to revisit time and again. These are the most rewatchable dark films reviewed by film critic Steve Hutchison.

Sorted in order of preference and reviewed, each film description contains a synopsis, a list of genres it belongs to, a list of ambiances involved, seven ratings and a three-paragraph review.

These films are not for the squeamish. You have been warned!

Cry of the Werewolf

A young woman raised by gypsies hides a secret which she will do anything to protect.
Creature Feature

 

United States
1944
Feature Film
Realism: 
Supernatural
Character Focus: 
Lycanthrope Film
Animals: 
Wolf
Trickster: 
Impostor
Lycanthropy: 
Werewolf
3.04
A bad hair day
5.04
3.04
6
3.04
1
2
1
Photography
Pace
Plot
Modern werewolf movies show too much and old ones don’t show nearly enough. Some of the 1930s and 1940s lycanthropy films were visionary, at the time of their release, but are generally underwhelming when looking back. Filmmakers of the 1940s were much more invested in dialogue than they were in scaring the audience. Horror, as we see it today, wasn’t even a genre.
Movies, then, were glorified plays. Cry of the Werewolf is no exception. It’s a dialogue-driven procedural that beats around the bush. You may or may not see the beast before the end credits. Don’t hold your breath. It’s one thing to talk about a werewolf in a black and white movie; another to actually show it. And, if we do see it, it’s never what we imagined.
The actors are good but stiff. Men in expensive suits talking about monsters with a straight face are always amusing, but this is no comedy. Cry of the Werewolf is dead serious. There’s a romantic subplot shoved in there, because we need that. Another subplot involves a Romani princess and some kind of curse. Wait, where is the werewolf I paid two bucks to see?
My Movie Reviews

Be your own film critic!

• Record the movies you see.
• Break them down and analyze them.
• Categorize them.
• Share your movie journal with friends.
• 200 pages, 6" x 9"

My Nightmare Diary

• Write about your nightmares in this dream diary. Write about places, people, and what scared you. Draw pictures of your nightmares.
• A great notebook to keep at your bedside to record your dreams and analyze them.
• 120 pages, 6" x 9"

Frankenstein Reviewed: 2020 Edition

Horror critic Steve Hutchison analyzes 39 Frankenstein movies. How many have you seen? Each article includes a synopsis, five different ratings, and a review.

Dracula Reviewed: 2020 Edition

Horror critic Steve Hutchison analyzes 34 Dracula movies. How many have you seen? Each article includes a synopsis, five different ratings, and a review.

Godzilla Reviewed: 2020 Edition

Horror critic Steve Hutchison analyzes the 36 first Godzilla movies. How many have you seen? Each article includes a synopsis, five different ratings, and a review.